Pseudomorphic HEMT

The Pseudomorphic HEMT makes up the majority of High Electron Mobility Transistors, so it is important to discuss this typology. The pHEMT differentiates itself in many ways including its increased mobility and distinct Quantum well shape. The basic idea is to create a lattice mismatch in the heterostructure.

A standard HEMT is a field effect transistor formed through a heterostructure rather than PN junctions. This means that the HEMT is made up of compound semiconductors instead of traditional silicon FETs (MOSFET). The heterojunction is formed when two different materials with different band gaps between valence and conduction bands are combined to form a heterojunction. GaAs (with a band gap of 1.42eV) and AlGaAs (with a band gap of 1.42 to 2.16eV) is a common combination. One advantage that this typology has is that the lattice constant is almost independent of the material composition (fractions of each element represented in the material). An important distinction between the MESFET and the HEMT is that for the HEMT, a triangular potential well is formed which reduces Coloumb Scattering effects. Also, the MESFET modulates the thickness of the inversion layer while keeping the density of charge carriers constant. With the HEMT, the opposite is true. Ideally, the two compound semiconductors grown together have the same or almost similar lattice constants to mitigate the effects of discontinuities. The lattice constant refers to the spacing between the atoms of the material.

However, the pseudomorphic HEMT purposely violates this rule by using an extremely thin layer of one material which stretches over the other. For example, InGaAs can be combined with AlGaAs to form a pseudomorphic HEMT. A huge advantage of the pseudomorphic typology is that there is much greater flexibility when choosing materials. This provides double the maximum density of the 2D electron gas (2DEG). As previously mentioned, the field mobility also increases. The image below illustrates the band diagram of this pHEMT. As shown, the discontinuity between the bandgaps of InGaAs and AlGaAs is greater than between AlGaAs and GaAs. This is what leads to the higher carrier density as well as increased output conductance. This provides the device with higher gain and high current for more power when compared to traditional HEMT.

1

The 2DEG is confined in the InGaAs channel, shown below. Pulse doping is generally utilized in place of uniform doping to reduce the effects of parasitic current. To increase the discontinuity Ec, higher Indium concentrations can be used which requires that the layer be thinner. The Indium content tends to be around 15-25% to increase the density of the 2DEG.

1

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s