Mathematical Formulation for Antennas: Radiation Integrals and Auxiliary Potentials

This short paper will attempt to clarify some useful mathematical tools for antenna analysis that seem overly “mathematical” but can aid in understanding antenna theory. A solid background in Maxwell’s equations and vector calculus would be helpful.

Two sources will be introduced: The Electric and Magnetic sources (E and M respectively). These will be integrated to obtain either an electric and magnetic field directly or integrated to obtain a Vector potential, which is then differentiated to obtain the E and H fields. We will use A for magnetic vector potential and F for electric vector potential.

Using Gauss’ laws (first two equations) for a source free region:

cfr

And also the identity:

1

It can be shown that:

2

In the case of the magnetic field in response to the magnetic vector potential (A). This is done by equating the divergence of B with the divergence of the curl of A, which both equal zero. The same can be done from Gauss Law of electricity (1st equation) and the divergence of the curl of F.

Using Maxwell’s equations (not necessary to know how) the following can be derived:

3

For total fields, the two auxiliary potentials can be summed. In the case of the Electric field this leads to:

4

The following integrals can be used to solve for the vector potentials, if the current densities are known:

5

For some cases, the volume integral is reduced to a surface or line integral.

An important note: most antenna calculations and also the above integrals are independent of distance, and therefore are done in the far field (region greater than 2D^2/λ, where D is the largest dimension of the antenna).

The familiar duality theorem from Fourier Transform properties can be applied in a similar way to Maxwell’s equations, as shown.

mxw

In the chart, Faraday’s Law, Ampere’s Law, Helmholtz equations and the above mentioned integrals are shown. To be perfectly honest, I think the top right equation is wrong. I believe is should have permittivity rather than permeability.

Another important antenna property is reciprocity… that is the receive and transmit radiation patterns are the same , given that the medium of propagation is linear and isotropic. This can be compared to the reciprocity theorem of circuits, meaning that a volt meter and source can be interchanged if a constant current or voltage source is used and the circuit components are linear, bilateral and discrete elements.

 

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