The Helical Antenna

The helical antenna is a frequently overlooked antenna type commonly used for VHF and UHF applications and provides high directivity, wide bandwidth and interestingly, circular polarization. Circular polarization provides a huge advantage in that if two antennas are circularly polarized, the will not suffer polarization loss due to polarization mismatch. It is known that circular polarization is a special case of elliptical polarization. Circular polarization occurs when the Electric field vector (which defines the polarization of any antenna) has two components which are in quadrature with equal amplitudes. In this case, the electric field vector rotates in a circular pattern when observed at the target, whether it be RHP or LHP (right hand or left hand polarized).

Generally, the axial mode of the helix antenna is used but normal mode may also be used. Usually the helix is mounted on a ground plane which is connected to a coaxial cable using a N type or SMA connector.

The helix antenna can be broken down into triangles, shown below.

traignel

The circumference of each loop is given by πD. S represents the spacing between loops. When this is zero (and hence the angle of the triangle is zero), the helix antenna reduces to a flat loop. When the angle becomes a 90 degree angle, the helix reduces to a monopole linear wire antenna. L0 represents the length of one loop and L is the length of the entire antenna. The total height L is given as NS, where N is the number of loops. The actual length can be calculated by multiplying the number of loops with the length of one loop L0.

An important thing to note is that the helix antenna is elliptically polarized by default and must be manually designed to achieve circular polarization for a specific bandwidth. Another note is that the input impedance of the antenna depends greatly on the pitch angle (alpha).

The axial (endfire) mode, which is more common occurs when the circumference of the antenna is roughly the size of the wavelength. This mode is easier to achieve circular polarization. The normal mode features a much smaller circumference and is more omnidirectional in terms of radiation pattern.

The Axial ratio is the numerical quantity that governs the polarization. When AR = 1, the antenna is circularly polarized. When AR = ∞ or 0, the antenna is linearly polarized. Any other quantity means elliptical polarization.

itsover

The axial ratio can also be approximated by:

AR

For axial mode, the radiation pattern is much more directional, as the axis of the antenna contains the bulk of the radiation. For this mode, the following conditions must be met to achieve circular polarization.

Axial

These are less stringent than the normal mode conditions.

It is also important to consider that the input impedance of these antennas tends to be higher than the standard impedance of a coaxial line (100-200 ohms compared to 50). Flattening the feed wire of the antenna and covering the ground plane with dielectric material helps achieve a better SWR.

h

This equation can be used to calculated the height of the dielectric used for the ground plane. It is dependent on the transmission line characteristic impedance, strip width and the dielectric constant of the material used.

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