Updates from December, 2019 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • mbenkerumass 8:04 pm on December 2, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    OrCAD PCB Layout 

    ECE457 Senior Design
    Michael Benker
    December 2019

     

    prelimpcb

     
    • Tuong 9:39 pm on December 2, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hi, What is function of this circuit?

      Like

      • mbenkerumass 7:21 am on December 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks for the comment! This device is proposed to adjust the volume output between an audio source and headphones relative to the sound level in the surrounding environment. Possible applications could be in noise cancelling technology, for instance.

        Like

    • Tuong 10:46 am on December 3, 2019 Permalink | Reply

      Hi Michael. Thanks for reply. Interesting! May be you can show the real board when available, plz. I just curious.

      Like

  • mbenkerumass 8:11 pm on November 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    OrCAD Schematic – (Senior Design Project) 

    ECE457 Senior Design
    Michael Benker
    November 2019

    OrCAD Schematic

    The schematic below was made using OrCAD Capture CIS. A PCB design is soon to follow. This schematic was made partially as a visual demonstration and therefore features components that will not be part of the pcb, such as buttons, which will be panel-mounted.

     

    Capture

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 10:00 am on November 29, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Filters,   

    Microstrip Coupled Line Bandpass Filter 

    ECE435 RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Li
    Michael Benker
    November 2019

    Microstrip Coupled Line Bandpass Filter

    Capture

    1

    2

    3

    Final Results:

    4

     

    project8

     
  • mbenkerumass 9:59 am on November 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    034/100 Loaded Q and External Q 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 4.2-3: Analyze the parallel resonator that is attached to a 50 Ohm source and load as shown.

    034.0

    This problem is specifically asking to define the Q factor related to this circuit. The Q factor is a ratio of energy stored (by an inductor or capacitor) to the power dissipated in a resistor. The Q factor varies with frequency since the effect of a capacitor or inductor also vary with frequency. For a series resonant circuit, the “unloaded” Q factor is defined by the following function: Qu = X / R = 1/(wRC) = wL/R

    The unloaded Q factor of a parallel resonant circuit: Qu = R / X = R/(wL) = wRC

    Overall, the Q factor is a measure of loss in the resonant circuit. A higher Q corresponds to lower loss, while a lower Q indicated higher loss. An “unloaded” Q factor means that the resonator is not connected to a source or load. The above circuit can no longer apply the “unloaded” Q factor formulas due to the presence of a source and a load. There are two further Q factor formulas that need to be considered: loaded Q factor and external Q factor. The loaded Q factor includes the source resistance and load resistance with the resistance of the circuit. The external Q factor refers to only the source resistance and load resistance together.

    For the above circuit, the loaded Q factor for the parallel resonator is defined as:

    Loaded Q = (Rs + R + Rl)/(wL) = (Source resistance + R + load resistance) / (wL)

    The external Q factor for the source resistance and load resistance is:

    External Q = (Rs + Rl)/(wL) = (Source resistance + load resistance)/(wL)

    The relationship between the different types of Q factors are:

    1/(Loaded Q) = 1/(External Q) + 1/(Unloaded Q)

     
  • mbenkerumass 11:35 am on November 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    033/100 Parallel Resonant Circuits 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 4.2-2: Analyze a rearrangement of the RLC components into a parallel configuration.

    As observable by the following figures, the resonant frequency and impedance value remain the same for the parallel RLC circuit. What may be understood by this is that the reactance of the inductor cancels out the reactance of the capacitor at this frequency of 505 MHz.

    The input admittance of a parallel resonant circuit is: Y = (1/R) + jwC + (1/jwL).

    The angular frequency, w = 2*pi*f = 1 / (sqrt(L*C)).

    033.1033.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 9:30 pm on November 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    032/100 Series Resonant Circuits 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 4.2-1: Analyze a one port series RLC circuit with R = 10 Ohms, L = 10 nH and C = 10 pF.

    According to the following results, the input impedance at resonance is 10 Ohms, which is the value of the resistor.

    The input impedance of an RLC series circuit is modeled by the following formula, a rather basic expression: Z = R + jwL + 1/(jwC)

    The power delivered to the resonator is: P = |I|^2 * Z / 2.

    032.1032.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 9:13 pm on November 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    023/100 Distributed Bias Feed Design 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 2.11-3: Calculate the physical line length of the λ/4 sections of 80 Ω and 20 Ω microstrip lines at a frequency of 2 GHz. Create a schematic of a distributed bias feed network.

    A high impedance microstrip line of λ/4 can be used to replace the lumped inductor from problem 022/100 Example 2.11-2E. Likewise a quarter wave impedance line of a low impedance can replace the lumped shunt capacitor. The 80 Ohm and 20 Ohm transmission lines can be made using LineCalc at 2 GHz. The taper, tee and end-effect element are used to simulate the circuit most correctly and to remove discontinuities between the models.

    023.1023.2

    The return loss null occurs at 1.84 GHz, indicating that the system could be optimized better to adjust center frequency. The high impedance line length is now adjusted to center the frequency to 2 GHz:

    023.3023.4

     

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 8:36 pm on November 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    022/100 Microstrip Bias Feed Networks 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 2.11-2E: Design a lumped element biased feed network.

    Bias feed networks are an important application of high impedance and low impedance microstrip transmission lines. The voltage bias may be needed for a device that is connected to the microstrip line, such as a transistor, MMIC amplifier or diode. The inductor in the circuit below is used as an “RF Choke”, which is used in tandem with a shunt or bypass capacitor for a “bias decoupling network.” Lumped elements are typically used for frequencies below 200 MHz.

    The following is a typical bias feed network, followed by a simulation:

    022.1022.2

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 7:45 pm on November 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    021/100 Distributed Inductance and Capacitance 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 2.11-2D: Convert the lumped element capacitors and inductors to distributed elements.

    This is the schematic that needs to be changed into distributed element microstrip lines:

    021.1

    The following formulas are needed to calculate the inductive and capacitive line lengths to simulate this schematic using microstrip lines.

    Inductive line length: (frequency)*(wavelength)*(Inductance)/(impedance of line)

    Capacitive line length: (frequency)*(wavelength)*(Capacitance)*(impedance of line)

    In order to know what at which frequency the inductance or capacitance are calculated, let’s run the simulation of the above circuit:

    021.2

    This circuit is centered at 10 GHz, since the circuit behaves as a terminated open-circuited transmission line with an open-parallel resonance at 180 degrees, or twice the length of a quarter wave line.

    The above circuit is then modeled as follows:

    021.3

    021.4

     
  • mbenkerumass 4:10 pm on November 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    020/100 Open-Circuited Transmission Line with Termination 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 2.11-2C: Calculate the input impedance of a quarter wave open-circuited microstrip transmission line using termination with end effects.

    An open circuit microstrip line generates a capacitive end effect due to radiation. This radiation is observable in the results from the following simulation. Note that the impedance at 180 degrees is more capacitive than was the open circuit transmission line with out any termination.

    020.1020.2019.3

     
  • mbenkerumass 2:23 pm on November 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    019/100 Open-Circuit Transmission Line 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 2.11-2B: Calculate the input impedance of a quarter wave open-circuited microstrip transmission line for a given length of time.

    The reactance of a lossless open circuit transmission line can be modeled as being equal to the characteristic impedance multiplied by the cotangent of the electrical length of the transmission line in degrees.

    X = Z * cot(Θ)

    To construct this circuit, a termination of 1 MOhms is used to simulate an open circuit. As the electrical length in degrees varies with frequency (the wavelength), a static electrical length of a transmission line varied over many frequencies will suffice to demonstrate the reactance of a varying electrical length transmission line. The following circuit was created with a transmission line optimized for 10 GHz, similar to the Short-circuited Transmission Line:

    019.1019.2

    The results above are consistent with the theoretical model of an open circuit transmission line being modeled by a cotangent relationship. At the optimized frequency (at which the transmission line length is quarter-wave) it can be observed that the impedance of the line is measured to be zero. At a half-wave length and other multiples of a half wave length, the transmission line generates high levels of resonance.

    019.3

     
  • mbenkerumass 1:33 pm on November 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    018/100 Short-circuited Transmission Line 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Example 2.11-2A: Calculate the input impedance of a short-circuited microstrip transmission line for a given electrical length of the line.

    This circuit was built with a quarter-wave microstrip synthesized for 10 GHz with given substrate (conductivity of gold) using the LineCalc tool.

    018.1018.2

    The following results conclude that a short-circuited quarter-wave transmission line has high impedance, similar to an open circuit. A short circuited transmission line that is not a quarter-wave transmission line will not have high impedance as demonstrated by frequencies far outside of the range of optimization (10 GHz). This phenomena is is consistent with electromagnetic theory on transmission lines.

    018.3018.4

    Theoretical relationship between transmission line length (short-circuited) and it’s imaginary impedance component:

    018.5

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 10:14 am on November 10, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Random Signal Analyzer – MATLAB 

    ECE457 Senior Design
    November 2019
    Michael Benker

    Random Signal Analyzer

    The following MATLAB program is designed to create a random signal and analyze statistical properties. The applications for this are a current senior design project and the code may eventually be implemented in a project that involves a sound level analysis program on a microcontroller.

    RandomSoundLevelAnalyzer

    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

     
  • mbenkerumass 7:21 pm on November 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Rat Race Coupler: ADS 

    ECE435 – RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    November 2019
    Michael Benker
    Rat Race Coupler ADS Simulation

     

    1234

     

    project7

     
  • mbenkerumass 7:11 pm on November 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Frequency Shift Keying 

    ECE471 – Communication Theory, Professor Dr. Paul Gendron
    November 2019
    Michael Benker
    Frequency Shift Keying

    300px-Fsk.svg

    The following MATLAB code simulates Frequency Shift Keying, an essential part of Communications.

    fsk1fsk2

     

    inclass20191105

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 4:17 pm on October 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Directional Coupler ADS Simulation 

    ECE435 – RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    Directional Coupler ADS Simulation

     

    Capture

    Project6(Fixed)(1)

     
  • mbenkerumass 10:20 pm on October 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    MATLAB Data Analysis – Senior Design Project Component 

    ECE457 – Senior Design Project, Professor Dr. Fortier
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    MATLAB Data Analysis

     

    The following code was one component of my current Senior Design Project assignment, which will involve the creation of a device known as the “Audio Awareness Enabler.” More information relating to this project is sure to follow in the future. For now, let us take a look at the following MATLAB code, which takes excel files of data and calculates the averages and standard deviations and then plots a Gaussian normal plot. Soon, this code will be modified to be able to determine whether a set of data will fall into the “ambient” range or one of the three interrupt levels. It will also eventually seek to create a formula that will determine whether a set of data is in the interrupt zone based on the ambient level.

    See the pdf file: ece457p9v002

     

    Data at one location:

    44.1

    Next location:

    44.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 7:11 am on October 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    ADS Coupler Momentum Simulation 

    ECE435 – RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    ADS Coupler Momentum Simulation

    Build the ADS circuit.

    20191017.3

    Run the momentum simulation and set parameters such as substrate.

    20191017.1

    This is a momentum simulation. Let’s see if we can optimize this.

    20191017.2

    Export the part to be used as a component in the workspace library in ADS.

    20191017.4

    Now run an ADS simulation using the exported component, which uses a database of simulated results.

    20191017.5

    If you step into the component, you will see component features.

    20191017.6

    Now, tune the parameters to begin optimization.

    20191017.7

     
  • mbenkerumass 10:28 pm on October 10, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Branchline Coupler – EM Simulation 

    ECE435 – RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    ADS Momentum Simulation

    Capture2

    CaptureCapture1Capture3

     
  • mbenkerumass 12:48 am on October 9, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    MATLAB Simulation: Voltage Control Oscillator 

    ECE471 – Communication Theory, Professor Dr. Paul Gendron
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    Voltage Control Oscillator MATLAB Simulation, Integral to Costa’s Receiver

    voltagecontroloscillatorsim

     
  • mbenkerumass 10:19 pm on October 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    ADS Momentum Simulation 

    ECE435 – RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    ADS Momentum Simulation

     

    Capture1Capture2Capture3Capture4Capture5Capture6Capture7Capture8

     
  • mbenkerumass 12:41 am on October 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Quadrature Hybrid Coupler 

    ECE435 – RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    Project 4 – Quadrature Hybrid Coupler

    Presentation: Project4_presentation

    p4tuning

    p4results_optimized

     
  • mbenkerumass 1:30 am on September 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Smith Chart Impedance Matching 

    ECE435 – RF/Microwave Engineering, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    September 2019
    Michael Benker
    Project 1 – Smith Chart Impedance Matching

    Presentation: proj1_presentationproj1_schematic

    proj1_smithchart

    proj1_simulation

     
  • mbenkerumass 8:26 pm on June 29, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    016/100 Example 2.9-1 Waveguide Insertion Loss 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 2.9-1: Consider the model of a one inch and a three inch length of the waveguide as used in an X Band satellite transmission system. Display the insertion loss of the waveguides from 4 to 8 GHz.

    377 Ohms simulates free space

    016.1016.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 7:10 pm on June 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    014/100 Example 2.4-1 VSWR Measurement of Series RLC 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    Example 2.4-1: For series RLC elements, measure the reflection coefficients and VSWR from 100 to 1000 MHz in 100 MHz steps.

    014.1014.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 4:45 pm on June 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    013/100 Example 1.5-2B Physical Capacitor Q Factor versus Frequency 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    October 2019
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.5-2B: Calculate the Q factor versus frequency for the modified physical model of an 8.2 pF multilayer chip capacitor.

    013.1013.2

    013.3

     
  • mbenkerumass 4:30 pm on June 25, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    012/100 Example 1.5-2A Dissipation Factor in Capacitor 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.5-2A: Calculate the Q factor versus frequency for the physical model of an 8.2 pF multilayer chip capacitor.

    012.1012.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 4:12 pm on June 24, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    011/100 Example 1.5-1 Single Layer Capacitor 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.5-1 Consider the design of a single layer capacitor from a dielectric that is 0.010 inches thick and has a dielectric constant of three. Each plate is cut to 0.040 inches square. Calculate the capacitor value and its Q factor.

    Capacitance formed by a dielectric material between two parallel plate conductors:

    C = (N-1)(KAεr/t)(FF) pF

    A: plate area
    εr: relative dielectric constant
    t: separation
    K: unit conversion factor; 0.885 for cm, 0.225 for inches
    FF: fringing factor; 1.2 when mounted on microstrip
    N: number of parallel plates

    011.1011.2

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 3:49 pm on June 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    010/100 Example 1.4-6 Magnetic Core Inductors 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.4-6 Design a 550 nH inductor using the Carbonyl W core of size T30/ Determine the number of turns and model the inductor in ADS.

    Number of turns calculation: N = sqrt(L/A) = sqrt(55nH/2.5) = 14.8

    010.1010.2

    010.3

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 1:09 pm on June 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    008/100 Example 1.4-4 Q Factor of Air Core Inductor 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.4-4 Calculate the Q factor of the air core inductor used in previous example 1.4-2.

    008.1008.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 12:57 pm on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    007/100 Example 1.4-3 Air Core Inductor Equivalent Network 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.4-3 Create a simple RLC network that gives an equivalent impedance response similar to previous example 1.4-2.

    007.1007.2

     
  • mbenkerumass 12:33 pm on June 19, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    006/100 Example 1.4-2 Air Core Inductor 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.4-2 Calculate and plot the input impedance of an air core inductor.

    006.1006.2

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 12:05 pm on June 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    004/100 Example 1.3-1B Parasitic Elements of a Physical Resistor vs. Frequency 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.3-1B: Plot the impedance of a 5 Ω leaded resistor in ADS over a frequency range of 0 to 2 GHz.

    004.1004.2

    This indicates a resonance at 500 MHz. This is due to the parasitic iductance and capacitance that exists on a real resistor. The resistor behaves as a combination of series parasitic inductance and resistance, in parallel with a parasitic capacitance.

    The impedance of an inductor is reduced as the frequency increases, while the impedance of a capacitor increases as the frequency increases. The intersection frequency of these two patters meet is the resonant frequency.

    The resonance frequency can be found from equating XL and XC. The formula is:

    Resonant frequency fR = 1/(2*pi*sqrt(LC))

     
  • mbenkerumass 11:47 am on June 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    003/100 Example 1.3-1A Ideal Resistors 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.3-1A Plot the impedance of a 50 Ω ideal resistor in ADS over a frequency range of 0 to 2 GHz.

    003.1003.2

    Thereby noting that an ideal resistor maintains constant impedance with respect to frequency.

    You were here and you read it, so don’t forget it.

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 3:30 pm on June 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    002/100 Example 1.2-4 Skin Effect and Flat Ribbons 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.2-4 Calculate the inductance of the 3 inch Ribbon at 60 Hz, 500 MHz, and 1 GHz. Make the ribbon 100 mils wide and 2 mils thick.

    002.1002.2

    The flat ribbon inductance is calculated with the following equation:

    L = K*l*[ ln((2*l)/(W+T))+0.223*(W+T)/l + 0.5 ] nH

    l: length of the wire
    K: 2 for dimensions in cm and K=5.08 for dimensions in inches
    W: the width of the conductor
    T: the thickness of conductor

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 3:15 pm on June 14, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    001/100 Example 1.2-1 Reactance and Inductance with respect to Frequency 

    100 ADS Design Examples Based on the Textbook: RF and Microwave Circuit Design
    Michael Benker
    Example 1.2-1: Calculate the reactance and inductance of a three inch length of AWG #28 copper wire in free space at 60 Hz, 500 MHz, and 1 GHz.

     

    001.1001.2

    > The increase in reactance with respect to frequency represents the skin effect property, in which, as the frequency increases, the current density begins to be concentrated on the surface of a conductor.

     
  • mbenkerumass 11:12 pm on June 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    100 ADS Design Examples, RF and Microwave Circuit Design 

    I found this book has a number of interesting problems that I would like to go through by myself to get some experience with ADS. I may change my mind, however I intend on posting my solutions to my blog (here) as I go through them, if I do. Stay tuned.

    41IqblbUzRL

     
  • mbenkerumass 4:50 am on April 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Analog Electronics, Multisim   

    Differential Amplifier 

    This lab demonstrates the rejection of common-mode noise while amplifying differential-mode signals. This is the final circuit in Multisim.

    fulldifferentialamplifiercircuit

    The circuit is comprised of one oscillator, one inverting amplifier, two weighted summers and one differential amplifier.

    This is a screen capture of the noise disconnected.

    differentialamplifieroutput

     

     
  • mbenkerumass 2:40 am on April 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    20 GHz RF Amplifier Design – ADS 

    ECE336 – Electromagnetic Theory II, Professor Dr. Yifei Li
    April 2019
    Michael Benker
    20 GHz RF Amplifier Design – ADS

    This is a 20 GHz amplifier circuit, made using smith chart impedance matching in ADS. This circuit is one of the first times I have used this powerful software. Glad to be putting my emag theory to work to build something real. The report should be helpful for me to jog my memory to do it again. With the notes I have, a similar circuit should be possible.

    For the impedance matching, I considered using an inductor, though using only caps and t-lines, the result seemed to be cleaner.

    20Ghzamplifiercircuit20Ghzamplifiercircuit2

     

    See the following for the full report:

    ece336projBENKER

     
  • mbenkerumass 1:21 pm on April 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: C, Embedded Systems Design   

    Digital Alarm Clock 

    Digital Alarm Clock Project – Embedded Systems Design

    See full report:

    Lab Report 5 – Digital Alarm Clock

    Digital Alarm Clock User Manual

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel